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Female dental patient in a dentist’s chair smiling.Female dental patient in a dentist’s chair smiling.

How Clean Teeth Impact Your Well-being

By: BeSeen Team

Date: January 31, 2024

Developing an oral care routine for clean teeth today will protect you against dental problems in the future. But more than giving you a healthy smile, maintaining good oral care habits can impact your overall well-being. Here, learn to elevate your dental hygiene and reap its benefits that reach beyond your teeth. 

How Clean Teeth Can Impact Your Health and Well-being 

News flash: The human mouth can harbour over 700 species of bacteria, reveals a Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology study. While many are harmless, some can wreak havoc on your body, especially if you skip to clean your teeth regularly. So, yes, consider toothbrushing one of your first layers of defence against countless health issues. Below are more benefits to look forward to when you prioritise your oral health.

Cavity prevention 

The World Health Organization (WHO) listed dental caries, or tooth decay, as the most common noncommunicable disease worldwide. That’s something to consider the next time you get tempted to kick your shoes off and hit the sack without cleaning your teeth. Never overlook seemingly small habits of brushing and flossing your teeth twice per day (once in the morning and at night).

Lower risk of tooth loss 

Research from The Journal of the American Dental Association reveals that more than one in three adults 65 years or older have already lost six or more teeth. So, even if you’re not in your 60s yet, you should take precautions now to prevent losing your teeth later.

Fresh breath 

Woman in a white bath robe smiling and smelling a mint leaf in the bathroom.
Get killer confidence from fresh breath and a healthy, dazzling smile!

Save yourself the embarrassment of being offered a mint by keeping your breath fresh. Harvard Medical School explains that bacteria in the mouth cause bad breath. Food particles accumulated between your teeth can lead to plaque and bacteria buildup, resulting in a foul smell. Other conditions like gum disease and a dry mouth may also make your mouth smell unpleasant.

Besides ensuring your teeth are clean, you should also keep your mouth hydrated by drinking plenty of water. And consider supplementing your oral hygiene routine with a therapeutic mouthwash. Before going to bed, give your mouth a quick swish to minimise morning breath.

A brighter smile 

Maybe you rely on consuming endless amounts of coffee to get through the day. If this is you, you should be aware of the teeth-staining effects from your cup of joe. So, trade your usual espresso for a light herbal tea. Or, if you can’t give up your coffee habit, try having it only in the morning. Doing this will give you time to brush your teeth right after and eliminate saturating your teeth in it all day.

Besides caffeinated drinks, highly acidic foods or beverages can damage your dental enamel. When you forget to brush or rinse your teeth after consumption, you increase your risk of teeth discolouration. Your lunch of puttanesca and key lime pie might make your tummy happy, but it will dampen the spirit of your smile. Tip: Instead of washing it all down with soda, grab a fresh glass of water to wash away any acids left behind.

Improved overall health 

You may already know clean teeth will do wonders for your smile, but maintaining good oral hygiene may help safeguard your overall health. Research from the International Journal of Molecular Sciences listed gum disease as one of the risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A healthy diet and regular exercise remain the best preventative measures against these conditions. But it won’t hurt to keep your teeth clean while you’re at it!

Better self-confidence 

Perhaps you’re used to shying away from the camera because of your yellowish teeth. Or maybe you often keep your thoughts to yourself because of your bad breath. Regain your confidence with clean teeth! Optimum oral hygiene ensures the health of your pearly whites and effectively boosts your self-esteem.

What Is the Best Way to Clean Your Teeth? 

Woman happily brushing her teeth in front of a mirror.
Besides brushing your teeth twice a day, develop habits like limiting sugar intake to keep your mouth fresh and clean!

No matter how attentive you are when brushing your teeth, you may still skip hard-to-reach areas, leading to plaque buildup. See your dentist bi-annually to get professional dental cleans and prevent conditions like calculus and cavities.  

When it comes to maintaining your dental hygiene at home, the American Dental Association recommends these best practices: 

  • Brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste
  • Timing your toothbrushing for two minutes
  • Flossing daily 
  • Limiting your intake of sugary food and drink
  • Drinking plenty of fluoridated water
  • Avoiding smoking cigarettes or any other use of tobacco products

Go the extra mile and fix malocclusions (crowding, overbites, etc.) that make cleaning the spaces between teeth more difficult. Ask your doctor about ClearCorrect! These aligners offer a subtle and comfortable approach to treating dental misalignments so you can achieve cleaner teeth and flash your smile with renewed confidence!

The truth is that maintaining clean teeth isn’t just about toothbrushing and flossing twice a day. It also involves making lifestyle adjustments that result in total mind and body wellness. Remember: The condition of your teeth can dictate how the rest of your body feels, so make sure you keep your oral health a top priority. 

 

References: 

Deo, P. N., & Deshmukh, R. (2019). Oral microbiome: Unveiling the fundamentals. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, 23(1), 122.

Home Oral care. (n.d.). American Dental Association.

Liccardo, D., Cannavò, A., Spagnuolo, G., Ferrara, N., Cittadini, A., Rengo, C., & Rengo, G. (2019). Periodontal disease: a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 20(6), 1414.

Mark, A. (2020). Preventing tooth loss. The Journal of the American Dental Association, 151(9). 

Mph, A. V. D. P. (2019, January 21). Bad breath: What causes it and what to do about it. Harvard Health.

World Health Organization: WHO. (2017, November 9). Sugars and dental caries. 

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