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A woman with healthy teeth smiling in front of the mirror.A woman with healthy teeth smiling in front of the mirror.

7 Telltale Signs of Healthy Teeth

By: BeSeen Team

Date: June 14, 2023

Claiming you have healthy teeth takes more than facing a mirror and flashing the brightest set of pearly whites. Remember: just because they look sparkling doesn’t necessarily mean they’re in tip-top shape! The task requires a thorough assessment involving every nook and cranny – best with the help of your trusted dentist, of course. Then you should also check your gums, tongue, and breath as they offer valuable clues about your oral well-being.  

Here, discover the telltale signs of healthy teeth that will make you extra proud to flaunt your million-dollar smile.   

Why You Should Check for Healthy Teeth Signs  

Two women laughing and eating ice cream outdoors.
Having healthy teeth means eating cold or hot food without discomfort.

Did you know that oral health is the gateway to your overall health? According to the peer-reviewed journal Medicina, “Scientific research in the medical field shows this constantly: health starts from the mouth.” The literature has also demonstrated possible implications of poor oral health, including complications in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Conversely, good oral hygiene could prevent pathologies and “have great systemic implications… for society and for the quality of life in individuals.”  

How long can teeth stay healthy? As long as you want to reduce the risk of diseases, maintain good oral health, and promote overall well-being! Maintaining healthy teeth offers the following perks:  

  • Prevents tooth decay and gum disease.  
  • Allows you to enjoy your favorite food and beverages without discomfort.  
  • Helps avoid costly dental treatments in the future.  
  • Improves your smile. 
  • Boosts your confidence in social situations.  

7 Signs Your Teeth Are Healthy

An Asian woman showing off her healthy teeth.
Yellowish teeth aren’t always a cause for concern.

One winning smile can make you a picture of health. Watch for these signs to ensure your teeth are always in good shape. 

1. Similar-coloured teeth 

Contrary to popular belief, yellow teeth do not always equate to unhealthy teeth. The off-white tinge may be their natural shade – genetically determined by your dentin and the thickness of the enamel. However, yellow teeth can also be problematic because discolouration can arise from plaque buildup.  

Another cause for concern is if you notice a miscoloured tooth standing out from the set. The staining or darkening may be due to dental decay, an injury, a dead nerve, or an infection. In such cases, you should seek professional care instead of at-home whitening remedies.  

2. Firm, pink gums 

“Gums should be a healthy pink, and should be solid when touched,” says The Canadian Academy of Dental Health and Community Sciences (CADH). They should keep your teeth in place and build a barrier against bacteria. Healthy gums should not bleed, recede, turn red or white, or feel tender. If you notice any of these symptoms, you might be brushing too aggressively and putting pressure on the area. Or you could already be damaging your enamel and developing some form of disease.  

3. Moist, pink tongue 

Your tongue also offers valuable insights into your dental situation. Like your gums, it should be firm and pink. A white coating or any form of discolouration can indicate underlying oral issues. Additionally, the muscle should be moist – a sign that saliva effectively flushes out food particles from your teeth.  

4. Strong teeth 

Loose teeth are a source of excitement for kids. They mean a visit from the tooth fairy! But for adults, shaky permanent teeth can be worrisome. They point to gum disease, injury, plaque, stress, grinding, and overall poor oral hygiene. If you can wiggle a tooth easily, schedule a dentist appointment stat. The same goes if you notice loose crowns or fillings. 

5. Pleasant breath

A woman flossing her teeth in front of the mirror.
Flossing can help you determine if you have bad breath.

A mouth with healthy teeth should have a neutral smell. According to an Oral Diseases journal article, coated tongue, gum disease, and poor oral hygiene are the predominant causes of halitosis. Bad breath also suggests the presence of bacteria or decaying food particles and untreated tooth decay.  

To know your breath situation, scratch your tongue with a fingernail and take a whiff. Alternatively, you can smell your dental floss after cleaning. If you don’t notice any unpleasant odour, then you’re all clear. 

6. No tooth sensitivity  

Do you experience tooth discomfort when consuming hot or cold food and beverages? You may be dealing with dentin hypersensitivity (DH), which the Journal of Dentistry defines as “pain derived from exposed dentin in response to chemical, thermal tactile, or osmotic stimuli.”  

Research studies have found significant connections between DH and erosive tooth wear and gingival recession. Aggressive brushing and an acidic diet are also potential factors contributing to this condition.     

7. Aligned teeth 

The CADH adds: “Teeth that are overly crowded or too spaced out can cause bacteria to build as they can be harder to clean, and can lead to unnecessary wear and tear on the teeth.” Malocclusions also cause mouth breathing, jaw problems, gum disease, and tooth decay. They can also affect the way you eat and speak.  

To address these issues, orthodontists recommend aligners, like ClearCorrect, that improve dental hygiene and facilitate tooth preservation. According to a GMS Hygiene and Infection Control study, these transparent and removable dental appliances “facilitate oral hygiene and have been shown to significantly improve periodontal health indices.” Aligners also have the advantage of segmented tooth movement and shortened treatment time versus traditional braces.  

Feeling hopeless and starting to ask, “Is it too late to have healthy teeth?” Certainly not! If you’re having doubts, consult your dentist immediately. Certain factors, like cavities and abscesses, remain invisible to the naked (and untrained!) eye. So, take a proactive stance on your dental health and schedule a checkup today. 

  

References:  

Addy, M. (2005). Tooth brushing, tooth wear and dentine hypersensitivity — are they associated? International Dental Journal, 55, 261–267. 

Aylikci, B. U., & Çolak, H. (2013). Halitosis: From diagnosis to management. Journal of Natural Science, Biology, and Medicine, 4(1), 14. 

Davari, A. (2013, September 1). Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment; A Literature Review. PubMed Central (PMC). 

Europe PMC. (n.d.). Europe PMC

Fiorillo, L. (2019). Oral Health: The First Step to Well-Being. Medicina-lithuania, 55(10), 676. 

Hemadmin. (2021). 5 Signs That Teeth Are Healthy and Strong for Students in Dental Hygienist School. CADH

Khalid, A., & Quiñonez, C. (2015). Straight, white teeth as a social prerogative. Sociology of Health and Illness, 37(5), 782–796. 

Kramer, A., & Splieth, C. (2022). Health promotion through structured oral hygiene and good tooth alignment. DOAJ (DOAJ: Directory of Open Access Journals), 17, Doc08. 

Memon, M. A., Memon, H. A., Faizan-E-Muhammad, Fahad, S., Siddiqui, A. R., Lee, K. Y., Tahir, M., & Yousaf, Z. (2022). The aetiology and associations of halitosis: a systematic review. Oral Diseases

Vieira, A. R., Gibson, C. W., Deeley, K., Xue, H., & Li, Y. (2015). Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay. PLOS ONE, 10(4), e0124236. 

Watts, A., & Addy, M. (2001). Tooth discolouration and staining: a review of the literature. British Dental Journal, 190(6), 309–316. 

West, N. X., Sanz, M., Lussi, A., Bartlett, D. L., Bouchard, P., & Bourgeois, D. (2013). Prevalence of dentine hypersensitivity and study of associated factors: A European population-based cross-sectional study. Journal of Dentistry, 41(10), 841–851. 

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Previous Article

An Asian dentist checks a male patient’s teeth while he smiles.

Manage Malocclusion with These 5 Tips

Date: June 8, 2023
“Malocclusion” is the clinical term for teeth misalignment: one of the most prevalent oral health problems worldwide. Crookedness, bad bites, and other misalignment issues can lead to complications when you don’t address them with proper treatment. Learn to manage malocclusions and lessen their negative impact on your daily life, mental health, and self-confidence.  Types of […]
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